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  • £9.00

    Garuda Purana (Summary study of)

    The Garuda Purana is one of the eighteen principal Puranas, as stated in the Shrimad-Bhagavatam (SB 12.7.23-24): The eighteen major Puranas are the Brahma, Padma, Visnu, Siva, Linga, Garuda, Narada, Bhagavata, Agni, Skanda, Bhavisya, Brahma-vaivarta, Markandeya, Vamana, Varaha, Matsya, Kurma and Brahmanda Puranas. The Garuda Purana has nineteen thousand slokas.

    In a Bhagavad-gita lecture given in Los Angeles on February 15, 1969, Shrila Prabhupada said, “There are eighteen Puranas. Men are conducted in three qualities: the modes of goodness, modes of Passion, and modes of ignorance. To reclaim all these conditioned souls in different varieties of life, there are presentation of the Puranas. Six Puranas are meant for the person who is in the modes of goodness. And six Puranas are meant for the persons who are in the modes of passion. And six Puranas are for those who are in the modes of ignorance.”

    The Garuda Purana confirms that it is one of the six Puranas that are meant for persons in the mode of goodness. It says that the Bhagavata Purana is the foremost, the Visnu Purana is Next, and the Garuda Purana is third in importance.

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    Matsya Purana (Stories from)

    The Matsya Purana is one of the eighteen principal Puranas, as stated in the Shrimad-Bhagavatam (SB 12.7.23-24): The eighteen major Puranas are the Brahma, Padma, Visnu, Siva, Linga, Garuda, Narada, Bhagavata, Agni, Skanda, Bhavisya, Brahma-vaivarta, Markandeya, Vamana, Varaha, Matsya, Kurma and Brahmanda Puranas.

     

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    Padma Purana

    Padma Purana is one of the eighteen principal Puranas, as explained in the Shirmad-Bhagavatam (12.7.25):

     

    “The eighteen major Puranas are the Brahma, Padma, Vishnu, Shiva, Linga, Garuda, Narada, Bhagavata, Agni, Skanda, Bhavishya, Brahma-vaivarta, Markandeya, Vamana, Varaha, Matsya, Kurma and Brahmanda Puranas.”

     

    It is further explained that six of these Puranas are considered to be for those in the mode goodness, six are for those in passion, and six are for those in ignorance. The Padma Purana is one of the six for those in goodness.

    Padma Purana is divided into six Khandas comprising fifty-five thousand verses.

    The six Khandas are Srstikhanda, Bhumikhanda, Svargakhanda, Patalakhanda, Uttarakhanda and Kriyayogasara. The Uttarakhanda describes the importance of all months and also the lotus, the seat of Brahma.

    Contains the glory of Srimad-Bhagavatam; the stories of Rama, Jagannatha, Matsya, Ekadasi, Bhrgu, etc.

    Translation by Purnaprajna dasa. This is a story like book of flowing text summary, no Roman transliteration of verses.

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    Skanda Purana (Stories from the)

    Skanda Purana comes in the category of Satvik Puranas as it describes the stories of Lord Vishnu and that of his incarnations. The Skanda Purana consists of 81100 verses, and deals mainly with the glorification of Lord Siva and holy places of pilgrimage associated with him. There are also very intersting sections, that describe the glories of Jagannatha Puri and Vyenkata Hill, and many interesting stories. Srila Prabhupada used to quote verses from the Skanda Purana frequently. A summary told by Purnaprajna Dasa.

    Siva cast his spiritual energies into a fire. But Agni, the fire god, could not bear its radiance for long. He cast it into river Ganga, causing its cool waters to boil. The terrible heat thus generated, set fire to the reeds on the river banks. In great blaze, Siva’s energy transformed into a child, a boy with six beads and twelve arms.

    When the fire died out, six wondering nymphs called the Kritikkas, found the baby. They nursed him and took him to Siva. The sight of this extraordinary child filled the god with awe. He was given many names: Skanda, the energetic emission; Gangeya, the son of Ganga: and Kartik, the son of the Krittika maidens. Siva gave him a powerful lance, vel, as a weapon: a rooster for his insignia: and a peacock for his vehicle, his vahana.

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    Stories from Brahma-vaivarta Purana

    Brahmavaivarta is the most popular treatise among the eighteen Mahapuranas. This Mahapurana finds its reference everywhere in various Puranas and in the inventory of names to these Mahapuranas. Moreover, as per the yardstick ascertained, this Mahapurana contains eighteen thousand hymns in it too. As the preaching delivered by god Krsna to desperate Arjuna considering them as nectar of Srimad Bhagavad Gita, the special preaching delivered by the same god Krsna are stored in this Mahapurana too. As this Mahapurana discloses the mystery of Brahman, it is called Brahmavaivarta Mahapurana.

    In Brahma-vaivarta Purana, many very interesting details of familiar stories are found that are not seen elsewhere. There are many stories that explain the circumstances leading up to well-known occurrences, as well as previous lives of well-known personalities, shedding light on how they came to be in that condition. There is also a description of the marriage of Radha and Krsna, performed by Brahma. This may be a point of contention in some circles, but it was placed before Srila Prabhupada for his judgment while he was on a morning walk in Nellore in South India in 1976:

    Acyutananda: In South India there are very few Radha-Krsna devotees. And what they have is from some Puranas, the marriage of Radha and Krsna. They perform Radha-Krsna kalyana, marriage.

    Tamala Krsna: Is that bona fide, Prabhupada?

    Prabhupada: Yes.

    That Brahma-vaivarta Purana is a Vedic literature worthy of being read by present-day devotees was clearly indicated by Srila Prabhupada while conversing with disciples in Bhuvanesvara in 1977:

    Prabhupada: That will be nice. I was training, but they have not become so expert. As I am doing Bhagavad-gita, Srimad-Bhagavatam, they could do Padma Purana, Brahma-vaivarta Purana in the same way, but our students are not so expert.

    The Brahma-vaivarta purana consists of four parts-Brahma-khanda, Prakrti-khanda, Ganapati-khanda, and Krsna-janma-khanda. The Krsna-janma-khanda is the largest, comprising about half of the entire work. Although the Vrndavana pastimes are narrated in this khanda, they are briefly described in comparison with what is found in Srimad-Bhagavatam. There are interesting details not found elsewhere, however, including the previous lives of many prominent characters.

    This volume presents the Brahma-vaivarta Purana in story form, condensed so that the reader’s interest will be held.

     

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    Stories from Markandeya Purana

    There are 18 major Puranas: Brahma, Padma, Visnu, Siva, Linga, Garuda, Narada, Bhagavata, Agni, Skanda, Bhavisya, Braham-vaivarta, Markandeya, Vamana, Varaha, Matsya, Kurma and Brahmanda Purana. Markandeya Purana consists of nice thousand verses. The Puranas are divided into 3 modes. There are Puranas in the mode of goodness, passion and ignorance. Markandeya Purana is meant for those in the mode of ignorance, but still it is full of interesting stories, that give us glimpse of bygone ages and it also provides explanations of why certain events occurred.

    Markandeya Purana begins with the sage Jaimini asking 4 questions:”Why did Lord Vasudeva, the original creator, maintainer ans destroyer of the Universe, who is devoid of material qualities, assumed a humanlike form to descend upon the earth and engage in pastimes with His devotees? For what reason did Krsna, the daughter of King Drupada, become the common wife of the five Pandavas? How is it, that Lord Baladeva, the first expansion of the Supreme Personality of Godhead, went on a tour of holy places of pilgrimage so as to become freed from the sin of killing a brahmana? And, how is it that Draupadi’s five unmarried sons were killed after the great battle at Kuruksetra, as if they had no protector?” You will find the answers to these questions in this Purana.

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    Stories from Nrsimha Purana

    Nrsimha Purana is not one of the eighteen Puranas, but is one of the upa-puranas, or auxiliary Puranas. It is quite definitely a Purana in the mode of goodness, or a Vaisanva Purana, because from beginning to end it is nothing but glorification of Lord Visnu and His innumerable forms, one of which is Lord Nrsimha, as well as glorification of the Lord’s devotees, as well as His devotional service.

    A major portion of the Nrsimha Purana is taken up by summary descriptions of the dasa-avatara, or ten major pastimes incarnations of the Lord. Here the pastimes of Lord Ramacandra are described in greater detail than those of the other incarnations, so that is a kind of mini-Ramayana.

    The pastimes of Lord Nrsimhadeva are not told very elaborately, but there are many additional details found in this rendition. Nrsimha Purana is a very short work compared to other Puranas but the advantage there is that the stories are told in a concise manner and do not ramble on and on.

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    Stories From The Agni Purana

    Stories From The Agni Purana

    “The eighteen major Puranas are the Brahma, Padma, Vishnu, Shiva, Linga, Garuda, Narada, Bhagavata, Agni, Skanda, Bhavishya, Brahma-vaivarta, Markandeya, Vamana, Varaha, Matsya, Kurma and Brahmanda Puranas.”

     

    It is further explained that six of these Puranas are considered to be for those in the mode goodness, six are for those in passion, and six are for those in ignorance.